February 23, 2017
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For Honor: A Review on the Best Fighting Game of the Year

We’re gonna call it: it’s the best fighting game of the year.

It’s now also being considered as one of the best multiplayer games of the year, but what exactly makes For Honor great? It beat Sniper Elite 4, it was number one in the UK, it even had the honor of being featured in Conan O’Brien’s Clueless Gamer segment, and if word of mouth is any indication, reviews for the game are pretty solid.

What kind of warrior would you have been in the past?

The game has been out for a while and you may have seen it around in the internet. For Honor is firstly, a multiplayer game designed a little like first person shooter games in terms of gaining experience and rank, with the structure of online play. Instead of shooters, you play as a knight, a Viking, or a samurai.

In each faction, there is a variety of class types, all using the same basic control system. Though it’s easy to learn, it’s complex enough to let the player battle with some level of variety or improvisation.

Inside Image_For Honor2

Although it’s a multiplayer game, it plays a little like your usual fighting game, like Street Fighter or Tekken. And like Street Fighter, single player mode is not as satisfying.

Usually, a mix of different cultures from different eras in one game calls for a story that, although meta, has an interesting logic to it, because the basic premise is illogical in itself. This is where For Honor fails.

It’s certainly one of the best and most exciting fighting games we’ve had in a long time, with plenty of options for customization and self-expression that you can play in a wide variety of ways, and a gaming system that doesn’t just rely on luck but on skill.

The story is painfully flat and isn’t compelling on its own. It doesn’t help that the concept is incoherent without a good internal logic to back it up, so the plot suffers. All that’s left is a silly story about a fallen angel who desires a world of perpetual warfare.

The annoying thing about this is the story campaign is how you get your tutorial on the game and it’s filled with awful AI and would take you almost six hours to complete. (We don’t mean it will take six hours before you can play any mode, you can, the story just takes six hours of gameplay.) Clearly, For Honor shines in multiplayer.

Gameplay

The great thing about how you play the game is how every move you make must be deliberate. Button-mashing will not serve you well as you will need the ability to read your opponents’ intentions, hide your own, and move according to the info you get. It all comes down to the player’s ability to attack or block in one of three directions. The goal is to be able to trick your opponent or break their guard so that you can attack them in the direction they’re not blocking. There are various moves you can make here like parries, counters, feints, guard breaks, and dodges.

Inside Image_For Honor

It gets chaotic in their 4 vs. 4 mode though. So unless you belong to a team with all-human players with a sound strategy, don’t expect a match with predictable results. If you’re an all-human team with no AI up against a no-AI team as well, teamwork is of the utmost importance and failure to organize might as well mean defeat.

Will For Honor keep us interested?

Fighting may seem repetitive in the long run, but luckily, Ubisoft has announced a series of free DLC expansions for more variety and replay value. Considering how Ubisoft kept Rainbow Six well-nurtured, in the same manner we think we can trust Ubisoft on this.

It’s certainly one of the best and most exciting fighting games we’ve had in a long time, with plenty of options for customization and self-expression that you can play in a wide variety of ways, and a gaming system that doesn’t just rely on luck but on skill. Though we find the story severely lucking, it only makes up for in gameplay.

Ubisoft proves their mettle once again in the creation of good games people won’t turn away from, with proper build-up, marketing, and intricate gameplay. For Honor is available for PC, PS4, and Xbox One.

Graphics
5 out of 5
Gameplay
4.5 out of 5
Replay value
4.5 out of 5
Storyline
2 out of 5
Overall

For Honor has intensely detailed and crystal clear graphics, with lush environments and realistic movement. It suffers from a bad storyline though, with poor single-player experience. Despite these, gameplay is compelling and intricate, and with downloadable content on the way, gives it enough replay value. We still give it a 4 and yes, we can say it could very well be the best fighting game of the year.

4

Good
4 out of 5